Witaj GOŚCIU ( Zaloguj się | Rejestracja )
 
14 Strony  1 2 3 > »  
Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Wielka bitwa epoki brązu w dolinie rzeki Tollense, Tysiące walczących, setki poległych
     
pawelboch
 

VI ranga
******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 1.251
Nr użytkownika: 33.982

Pawel
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 17:32 Quote Post

Niezwykle ciekawe odkrycie po sąsiedzku, w Meklemburgii: tysiące dobrze uzbrojonych wojowników, setki poległych, piesi, konno, archeolodzy piszą wprost, że to największa (poznana) bitwa z epoce brązu na północ od Alp.
Czy takich bitew było więcej? Kto się starł w tej dolinie tak znacznymi siłami?

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/sla...eagebattle-3174

pzdr., PB

========================================================================

Slaughter at the bridge: Uncovering a colossal Bronze Age battle

By Andrew Curry, Mar. 24, 2016 , 9:30 AM

About 3200 years ago, two armies clashed at a river crossing near the Baltic Sea. The confrontation can’t be found in any history books—the written word didn’t become common in these parts for another 2000 years—but this was no skirmish between local clans. Thousands of warriors came together in a brutal struggle, perhaps fought on a single day, using weapons crafted from wood, flint, and bronze, a metal that was then the height of military technology.

Struggling to find solid footing on the banks of the Tollense River, a narrow ribbon of water that flows through the marshes of northern Germany toward the Baltic Sea, the armies fought hand-to-hand, maiming and killing with war clubs, spears, swords, and knives. Bronze- and flint-tipped arrows were loosed at close range, piercing skulls and lodging deep into the bones of young men. Horses belonging to high-ranking warriors crumpled into the muck, fatally speared. Not everyone stood their ground in the melee: Some warriors broke and ran, and were struck down from behind.

When the fighting was through, hundreds lay dead, littering the swampy valley. Some bodies were stripped of their valuables and left bobbing in shallow ponds; others sank to the bottom, protected from plundering by a meter or two of water. Peat slowly settled over the bones. Within centuries, the entire battle was forgotten.

How warriors were equipped for battle: Select a number to find out more.

In 1996, an amateur archaeologist found a single upper arm bone sticking out of the steep riverbank—the first clue that the Tollense Valley, about 120 kilometers north of Berlin, concealed a gruesome secret. A flint arrowhead was firmly embedded in one end of the bone, prompting archaeologists to dig a small test excavation that yielded more bones, a bashed-in skull, and a 73-centimeter club resembling a baseball bat. The artifacts all were radiocarbon-dated to about 1250 B.C.E., suggesting they stemmed from a single episode during Europe’s Bronze Age.

Now, after a series of excavations between 2009 and 2015, researchers have begun to understand the battle and its startling implications for Bronze Age society. Along a 3-kilometer stretch of the Tollense River, archaeologists from the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Department of Historic Preservation (MVDHP) and the University of Greifswald (UG) have unearthed wooden clubs, bronze spearheads, and flint and bronze arrowheads. They have also found bones in extraordinary numbers: the remains of at least five horses and more than 100 men. Bones from hundreds more may remain unexcavated, and thousands of others may have fought but survived.

“If our hypothesis is correct that all of the finds belong to the same event, we’re dealing with a conflict of a scale hitherto completely unknown north of the Alps,” says dig co-director Thomas Terberger, an archaeologist at the Lower Saxony State Service for Cultural Heritage in Hannover. “There’s nothing to compare it to.” It may even be the earliest direct evidence—with weapons and warriors together—of a battle this size anywhere in the ancient world.

Northern Europe in the Bronze Age was long dismissed as a backwater, overshadowed by more sophisticated civilizations in the Near East and Greece. Bronze itself, created in the Near East around 3200 B.C.E., took 1000 years to arrive here. But Tollense’s scale suggests more organization—and more violence—than once thought. “We had considered scenarios of raids, with small groups of young men killing and stealing food, but to imagine such a big battle with thousands of people is very surprising,” says Svend Hansen, head of the German Archaeological Institute’s (DAI’s) Eurasia Department in Berlin. The well-preserved bones and artifacts add detail to this picture of Bronze Age sophistication, pointing to the existence of a trained warrior class and suggesting that people from across Europe joined the bloody fray.

There’s little disagreement now that Tollense is something special. “When it comes to the Bronze Age, we’ve been missing a smoking gun, where we have a battlefield and dead people and weapons all together,” says University College Dublin (UCD) archaeologist Barry Molloy. “This is that smoking gun.”
Flint arrowhead embedded in upper arm

The flint arrowhead embedded in this upper arm bone first alerted archaeologists to the ancient violence in the Tollense Valley.

Landesamt Für Kultur Und Denkmalpflege Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Landesarchäologie/S. Suhr

The lakeside hunting lodge called Schloss Wiligrad was built at the turn of the 19th century, deep in a forest 14 kilometers north of Schwerin, the capital of the northern German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Today, the drafty pile is home to both the state’s department of historic preservation and a small local art museum.

In a high-ceilinged chamber on the castle’s second floor, tall windows look out on a fog-shrouded lake. Inside, pale winter light illuminates dozens of skulls arranged on shelves and tables. In the center of the room, long leg bones and short ribs lie in serried ranks on tables; more remains are stored in cardboard boxes stacked on metal shelves reaching almost to the ceiling. The bones take up so much space there’s barely room to walk.

When the first of these finds was excavated in 1996, it wasn’t even clear that Tollense was a battlefield. Some archaeologists suggested the skeletons might be from a flooded cemetery, or that they had accumulated over centuries.

There was reason for skepticism. Before Tollense, direct evidence of large-scale violence in the Bronze Age was scanty, especially in this region. Historical accounts from the Near East and Greece described epic battles, but few artifacts remained to corroborate these boastful accounts. “Even in Egypt, despite hearing many tales of war, we never find such substantial archaeological evidence of its participants and victims,” UCD’s Molloy says.

In Bronze Age Europe, even the historical accounts of war were lacking, and all investigators had to go on were weapons in ceremonial burials and a handful of mass graves with unmistakable evidence of violence, such as decapitated bodies or arrowheads embedded in bones. Before the 1990s, “for a long time we didn’t really believe in war in prehistory,” DAI’s Hansen says. The grave goods were explained as prestige objects or symbols of power rather than actual weapons. “Most people thought ancient society was peaceful, and that Bronze Age males were concerned with trading and so on,” says Helle Vandkilde, an archaeologist at Aarhus University in Denmark. “Very few talked about warfare.”
bronze age battle artifacts graphic

Archaeologists have recovered a wealth of artifacts from the battlefield.

Landesamt für Kultur und Denkmalpflege Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Landesarchäologie/S. Suhr

The 10,000 bones in this room—what’s left of Tollense’s losers—changed all that. They were found in dense caches: In one spot, 1478 bones, among them 20 skulls, were packed into an area of just 12 square meters. Archaeologists think the bodies landed or were dumped in shallow ponds, where the motion of the water mixed up bones from different individuals. By counting specific, singular bones—skulls and femurs, for example—UG forensic anthropologists Ute Brinker and Annemarie Schramm identified a minimum of 130 individuals, almost all of them men, most between the ages of 20 and 30.

The number suggests the scale of the battle. “We have 130 people, minimum, and five horses. And we’ve only opened 450 square meters. That’s 10% of the find layer, at most, maybe just 3% or 4%,” says Detlef Jantzen, chief archaeologist at MVDHP. “If we excavated the whole area, we might have 750 people. That’s incredible for the Bronze Age.” In what they admit are back-of-the-envelope estimates, he and Terberger argue that if one in five of the battle’s participants was killed and left on the battlefield, that could mean almost 4000 warriors took part in the fighting.

Brinker, the forensic anthropologist in charge of analyzing the remains, says the wetness and chemical composition of the Tollense Valley’s soil preserved the bones almost perfectly. “We can reconstruct exactly what happened,” she says, picking up a rib with two tiny, V-shaped cuts on one edge. “These cut marks on the rib show he was stabbed twice in the same place. We have a lot of them, often multiple marks on the same rib.”

Scanning the bones using microscopic computer tomography at a materials science institute in Berlin and the University of Rostock has yielded detailed, 3D images of these injuries. Now, archaeologists are identifying the weapons responsible by matching the images to scans of weapons found at Tollense or in contemporary graves elsewhere in Europe. Diamond-shaped holes in bones, for example, match the distinctive shape of bronze arrowheads found on the battlefield. (Bronze artifacts are found more often than flint at Tollense, perhaps because metal detectors were used to comb spoil piles for artifacts.)
Arrow in brain

A bronze arrow penetrated this skull, reaching the brain.

V. Minkus for the Tollense Valley Research Project

The bone scans have also sharpened the picture of how the battle unfolded, Terberger says. In x-rays, the upper arm bone with an embedded arrowhead—the one that triggered the discovery of the battlefield—seemed to show signs of healing. In a 2011 paper in Antiquity, the team suggested that the man sustained a wound early in the battle but was able to fight on for days or weeks before dying, which could mean that the conflict wasn’t a single clash but a series of skirmishes that dragged out for several weeks.

Microscopic inspection of that wound told a different story: What initially looked like healing—an opaque lining around the arrowhead on an x-ray—was, in fact, a layer of shattered bone, compressed by a single impact that was probably fatal. “That let us revise the idea that this took place over weeks,” Terberger says. So far no bodies show healed wounds, making it likely the battle happened in just a day, or a few at most. “If we are dealing with a single event rather than skirmishes over several weeks, it has a great impact on our interpretation of the scale of the conflict.”

In the last year, a team of engineers in Hamburg has used techniques developed to model stresses on aircraft parts to understand the kinds of blows the soldiers suffered. For example, archaeologists at first thought that a fighter whose femur had snapped close to the hip joint must have fallen from a horse. The injury resembled those that result today from a motorcycle crash or equestrian accident.

But the modeling told a different story. Melanie Schwinning and Hella Harten-Buga, University of Hamburg archaeologists and engineers, took into account the physical properties of bone and Bronze Age weapons, along with examples of injuries from horse falls. An experimental archaeologist also plunged recreated flint and bronze points into dead pigs and recorded the damage.

Schwinning and Harten-Buga say a bronze spearhead hitting the bone at a sharp downward angle would have been able to wedge the femur apart, cracking it in half like a log. “When we modeled it, it looks a lot more like a handheld weapon than a horse fall,” Schwinning says. “We could even recreate the force it would have taken—it’s not actually that much.” They estimate that an average-sized man driving the spear with his body weight would have been enough.

Why the men gathered in this spot to fight and die is another mystery that archaeological evidence is helping unravel. The Tollense Valley here is narrow, just 50 meters wide in some spots. Parts are swampy, whereas others offer firm ground and solid footing. The spot may have been a sort of choke point for travelers journeying across the northern European plain.

In 2013, geomagnetic surveys revealed evidence of a 120-meter-long bridge or causeway stretching across the valley. Excavated over two dig seasons, the submerged structure turned out to be made of wooden posts and stone. Radiocarbon dating showed that although much of the structure predated the battle by more than 500 years, parts of it may have been built or restored around the time of the battle, suggesting the causeway might have been in continuous use for centuries—a well-known landmark.

“The crossing played an important role in the conflict. Maybe one group tried to cross and the other pushed them back,” Terberger says. “The conflict started there and turned into fighting along the river.”
Tollense River

Today's peaceful meanders of the Tollense River once were the site of bitter fighting.

Landesamt für Kultur und Denkmalpflege Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Landesarchäologie/F. Ruchöft

In the aftermath, the victors may have stripped valuables from the bodies they could reach, then tossed the corpses into shallow water, which protected them from carnivores and birds. The bones lack the gnawing and dragging marks typically left by such scavengers.

Elsewhere, the team found human and horse remains buried a meter or two lower, about where the Bronze Age riverbed might have been. Mixed with these remains were gold rings likely worn on the hair, spiral rings of tin perhaps worn on the fingers, and tiny bronze spirals likely used as decorations. These dead must have fallen or been dumped into the deeper parts of the river, sinking quickly to the bottom, where their valuables were out of the grasp of looters.

At the time of the battle, northern Europe seems to have been devoid of towns or even small villages. As far as archaeologists can tell, people here were loosely connected culturally to Scandinavia and lived with their extended families on individual farmsteads, with a population density of fewer than five people per square kilometer. The closest known large settlement around this time is more than 350 kilometers to the southeast, in Watenstedt. It was a landscape not unlike agrarian parts of Europe today, except without roads, telephones, or radio.

And yet chemical tracers in the remains suggest that most of the Tollense warriors came from hundreds of kilometers away. The isotopes in your teeth reflect those in the food and water you ingest during childhood, which in turn mirror the surrounding geology—a marker of where you grew up. Retired University of Wisconsin, Madison, archaeologist Doug Price analyzed strontium, oxygen, and carbon isotopes in 20 teeth from Tollense. Just a few showed values typical of the northern European plain, which sprawls from Holland to Poland. The other teeth came from farther afield, although Price can’t yet pin down exactly where. “The range of isotope values is really large,” he says. “We can make a good argument that the dead came from a lot of different places.”

Further clues come from isotopes of another element, nitrogen, which reflect diet. Nitrogen isotopes in teeth from some of the men suggest they ate a diet heavy in millet, a crop more common at the time in southern than northern Europe.

They weren't farmer-soldiers who went out every few years to brawl. These are professional fighters.
Thomas Terberger, archaeologist at the Lower Saxony State Service for Cultural Heritage

Ancient DNA could potentially reveal much more: When compared to other Bronze Age samples from around Europe at this time, it could point to the homelands of the warriors as well as such traits as eye and hair color. Genetic analysis is just beginning, but so far it supports the notion of far-flung origins. DNA from teeth suggests some warriors are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland and Scandinavia. “This is not a bunch of local idiots,” says University of Mainz geneticist Joachim Burger. “It’s a highly diverse population.”

As University of Aarhus’s Vandkilde puts it: “It’s an army like the one described in Homeric epics, made up of smaller war bands that gathered to sack Troy”—an event thought to have happened fewer than 100 years later, in 1184 B.C.E. That suggests an unexpectedly widespread social organization, Jantzen says. “To organize a battle like this over tremendous distances and gather all these people in one place was a tremendous accomplishment,” he says.

So far the team has published only a handful of peer-reviewed papers. With excavations stopped, pending more funding, they’re writing up publications now. But archaeologists familiar with the project say the implications are dramatic. Tollense could force a re-evaluation of the whole period in the area from the Baltic to the Mediterranean, says archaeologist Kristian Kristiansen of the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. “It opens the door to a lot of new evidence for the way Bronze Age societies were organized,” he says.

For example, strong evidence suggests this wasn’t the first battle for these men. Twenty-seven percent of the skeletons show signs of healed traumas from earlier fights, including three skulls with healed fractures. “It’s hard to tell the reason for the injuries, but these don’t look like your typical young farmers,” Jantzen says.
Bashed skull

This skull unearthed in the Tollense Valley shows clear evidence of blunt force trauma, perhaps from a club.

Landesamt für Kultur und Denkmalpflege Mecklenburg-Vorpommern/Landesarchäologie/D. Jantzen

Standardized metal weaponry and the remains of the horses, which were found intermingled with the human bones at one spot, suggest that at least some of the combatants were well-equipped and well-trained. “They weren’t farmer-soldiers who went out every few years to brawl,” Terberger says. “These are professional fighters.”

Body armor and shields emerged in northern Europe in the centuries just before the Tollense conflict and may have necessitated a warrior class. “If you fight with body armor and helmet and corselet, you need daily training or you can’t move,” Hansen says. That’s why, for example, the biblical David—a shepherd—refused to don a suit of armor and bronze helmet before fighting Goliath. “This kind of training is the beginning of a specialized group of warriors,” Hansen says. At Tollense, these bronze-wielding, mounted warriors might have been a sort of officer class, presiding over grunts bearing simpler weapons.

But why did so much military force converge on a narrow river valley in northern Germany? Kristiansen says this period seems to have been an era of significant upheaval from the Mediterranean to the Baltic. In Greece, the sophisticated Mycenaean civilization collapsed around the time of the Tollense battle; in Egypt, pharaohs boasted of besting the “Sea People,” marauders from far-off lands who toppled the neighboring Hittites. And not long after Tollense, the scattered farmsteads of northern Europe gave way to concentrated, heavily fortified settlements, once seen only to the south. “Around 1200 B.C.E. there’s a radical change in the direction societies and cultures are heading,” Vandkilde says. “Tollense fits into a period when we have increased warfare everywhere.”

Tollense looks like a first step toward a way of life that is with us still. From the scale and brutality of the battle to the presence of a warrior class wielding sophisticated weapons, the events of that long-ago day are linked to more familiar and recent conflicts. “It could be the first evidence of a turning point in social organization and warfare in Europe,” Vandkilde says.

Ten post był edytowany przez pawelboch: 25/03/2016, 19:14
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #1

     
WojciechS
 

III ranga
***
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 212
Nr użytkownika: 84.297

Zawód: student
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 18:20 Quote Post

QUOTE
DNA from teeth suggests some warriors are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland and Scandinavia.


To mógł być taki Grunwald z epoki brązu. Ciekawe, kto wygrał? Słowianie czy Skandynawowie? Po której stronie walczyły posiłki z południa Europy? W tym czasie związki Polski z południem już były silne, mamy ‘Karpackie Mykeny”, a więc chyba Bałkany były z nami. Kto walczył po stronie Skandynawów? Czytałem gdzieś o bliskich kontaktach handlowych Skandynawii z półwyspem Iberyjskim w tamtych czasach. Bardzo to wszystko ciekawe. Czekamy na analizy DNA.

Ten post był edytowany przez WojciechS: 25/03/2016, 18:26
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #2

     
Domen
 

IX ranga
*********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 7.938
Nr użytkownika: 14.456

 
 
post 25/03/2016, 20:15 Quote Post

Największa odkryta dotąd bitwa epoki brązu w Europie, do której doszło na przeprawie przez rzekę Dołężę (Tollensee). Już znaleziono ponad 130 poległych wojowników oraz pięć zabitych koni, a przebadano jak dotąd zaledwie kilka procent (maksymalnie 1/10) całej powierzchni pola bitwy. Badania izotopów ze szkliwa zębów oraz próbek DNA wskazują, że wojownicy pochodzili z wielu różnych grup etnicznych i z przybyli na pole bitwy nawet z obszarów odległych o kilkaset kilometrów:

http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.co.uk/2...nse-battle.html

http://gepris.dfg.de/gepris/OCTOPUS;jsessi...task=showDetail

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/25...eastern_Germany

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/sla...eagebattle-3174

Fragmenty z ostatniego z powyższych linków przetłumaczone na polski:

"Około 3200 lat temu, dwie armie starły się na przeprawie rzecznej w pobliżu Morza Bałtyckiego. Opisu tej konfrontacji nie da się znaleźć w żadnej książce historycznej - słowo pisane nie upowszechniło się w tej części świata przez kolejne 2000 lat po bitwie - ale nie była to żadna potyczka między miejscowymi klanami. Tysiące wojowników zebrało się by stoczyć brutalną walką, wszystko odbyło się prawdopodobnie w ciągu jednego dnia, przy użyciu broni wykonanej z drewna, krzemienia oraz brązu - metalu, który wówczas stanowił szczyt osiągnięć technologii militarnej.

(...) armie walczyły w zwarciu, okaleczając się i zabijając maczugami, włóczniami, mieczami i nożami. Zakończone grotami z brązu oraz z krzemienia strzały wystrzeliwano z bliskiego dystansu, dzięki czemu przebijały czaszki i wbijały się głęboko w kości młodych mężczyzn. Konie należące do najznaczniejszych wojowników, które ugrzęzły w podmokłym terenie, zakłuto na śmierć włóczniami. Nie wszyscy utrzymali pola w walce wręcz - niektórzy wojownicy załamali się i rzucili do ucieczki, ale zabiły ich razy w plecy i w tył głowy.

Kiedy było po wszystkim, bagnistą dolinę zasłały setki trupów. Niektóre ciała obrabowano z wartościowych przedmiotów i pozostawiono w płytkich stawach; inne poszły na dno, chronione przed obrabowaniem przez metr czy dwa metry wody. (...) Stulecia mijały, a bitwa poszła w zapomnienie.

W roku 1996 archeolog amator znalazł pojedynczą kość barkową, wystającą ze stromego brzegu rzeki - pierwsza wskazówka, że Dolina Tollense, ok. 120 km na północ od Berlina, skrywała straszliwą tajemnicę. Mocno wbity krzemienny grot strzały wystawał z jednego końca kości, zachęcając archeologów do wykopania małego wykopu próbnego, który odsłonił więcej kości, czaszkę z wgnieceniem powstałym w wyniku uderzenia tępym narzędziem, oraz 73-centymetrowej długości maczugę przypominającą kij bejsbolowy. Wszystkie znaleziska metodą radiowęglową wydatowano na ok. roku 1250 p.n.e., co wskazuje, że wszystkie stanowią ślad jednego epizodu w historii epoki brązu w Europie.

Obecnie, po całej serii wykopalisk przeprowadzonych w latach od 2009 do 2015, badacze zaczęli lepiej rozumieć tę bitwę i jej zdumiewające konsekwencje dla społeczeństwa epoki brązu. Wzdłuż 3-kilometrowego odcinka rzeki Tollense, archeologowie z MVDHP oraz z Uniwersytetu w Greifswaldzie odkopali drewniane maczugi, brązowe groty włóczni, krzemienne i brązowe groty strzał. Znaleźli też kości w wyjątkowo dużych ilościach: szczątki co najmniej 5 koni oraz ponad 100 mężczyzn. Szczątki setek kolejnych poległych mogą nadal pozostawać pod ziemią, a następne tysiące mogły uczestniczyć w bitwie i ją przeżyć.

"Jeśli nasza hipoteza, że wszystkie te znaleziska są śladami po jednym wydarzeniu się potwierdzi, to mamy do czynienia z prehistorycznym konfliktem na skalę wcześniej nieznaną w obszarze na północ od Alp," mówi jeden z kierowników wykopalisk, archeolog Thomas Terberger. "Nie ma nic, z czym moglibyśmy to porównać". To może być nawet najstarszy bezpośredni dowód - z bronią i wojownikami w jednym miejscu - aż tak wielkiej bitwie gdziekolwiek w świecie starożytnym.

Północna Europa w epoce brązu długo była zbywana jako zaścianek, pozostający w cieniu bardziej zaawansowanych cywilizacji Bliskiego Wschodu oraz Grecji. Sam brąz, wynaleziony na Bliskim Wschodzie ok. roku 3200 p.n.e., dotarł tutaj dopiero 1000 lat później.

Ale skala bitwy pod Tollense wskazuje na wyższy stopień organizacji - oraz większy poziom przemocy - niż dawniej przypuszczano. "Braliśmy pod uwagę scenariusze wielu rajdów, z małymi grupami młodych mężczyzn zabijającymi się i kradnącymi jedzenie, ale zaskoczeniem dla wszystkich było znalezienie tak wielkiej bitwy, w której udział brały tysiące ludzi", mówi Svend Hansen, szef Departamentu Euroazjatyckiego Niemieckiego Instytutu Archeologicznego w Berlinie.

Dobrze zachowane kości i przedmioty dostarczają wielu detali do tego obrazu kompleksowości epoki brązu, wskazując na istnienie klasy dobrze wyszkolonych wojowników i sugerując, że ludzie z wielu różnych rejonów Europy przybyli aby wziąć udział w tej krwawej jatce.

Niewiele jest głosów sprzeciwiających się uznaniu, że odkrycie z Tollense jest czymś wyjątkowym. "Jeśli chodzi o epokę brązu, nie dostrzegaliśmy początkowo tych oczywistych dowodów, że mamy tutaj pole bitwy z poległymi ludźmi i bronią, wszystko razem", mówi archeolog z University College Dublin, Barry Molloy.

Kiedy pierwsze z tych znalezisk odsłonięto w 1996 roku, nie było nawet jasne, czy Tollense to pole bitwy. Niektórzy archeologowie sugerowali, że szkielety mogły pochodzić z zalanego cmentarza, albo że zakumulowały się w tym miejscu przez stulecia.

Powody do sceptycyzmu istniały. Przed odkryciem z Tollense, bezpośrednich dowodów na stosowanie przemocy na szeroką skalę w epoce brązu było niewiele, a zwłaszcza w tym regionie. Historyczne źródła pisane z Bliskiego Wschodu oraz z Grecji opisują epickie bitwy toczone w epoce brązu [np. historie spisane przez Homera] , ale niewiel odkryto znalezisk archeologicznych, które mogłyby dostarczyć dowodów na prawdziwość tych dumnych opowieści.

"Nawet w Egipcie, pomimo istnienia przekazów pisanych opisujących wojny, nigdy nie znaleźliśmy jak dotąd dowodów archeologicznych wskazujących na uczestników i ofiary tychże wojen", mówi Barry Molloy.

Natomiast z większości obszarów Europy epoki brązu, brakuje nawet historycznych opowieści o wojnach. Wszystko czym dysponowali badacze sprowadzało się do znalezisk broni w ceremonialnych pochówkach oraz garstki masowych grobów z bezspornymi dowodami stosowania przemocy, takimi jak szkielety ze ściętymi głowami czy groty strzał tkwiące w kościach. Przed latami 1990-tymi, "przez długi czas tak naprawdę nie chcieliśmy wierzyć w prehistoryczne wojny"", mówi Hansen z DAI. Wyposażenie grobów w broń próbowano wyjaśniać jako obiekty prestiżu czy symbole władzy, nie interpretując ich jako broń bojową.

"Wielu ludzi wyobrażało sobie, że prehistoryczne społeczeństwo było pokojowe, i że mężczyźni z epoki brązu byli bardziej pochłonięci zajęciami takimi jak handel, i tym podobne", dodaje Helle Vandkilde, archeolog z Uniwersytetu w Aarhus w Danii. "Tylko nieliczni mówili otwarcie o wojnach" [np. Marija Gimbutas - uwaga moja].

Ale 10,000 kości w tym pokoju - to co zostało po poległych spod Tollense - zmieniło te poglądy radykalnie. Kości poległych znaleziono w gęstych zgrupowaniach: w jednym miejscu, 1478 kości, wśród nich 20 czaszek, leżało na obszarze zaledwie 12 metrów kwadratowych. Archeologiwe myślą, że wojowie zginęli, albo ich wrzucono po śmierci, do płytkich stawów, gdzie falowanie wody następnie wymieszało kości pochodzące od innych osób. (...) Antropolodzy sądowi Ute Brinker oraz Annemarie Schram zidentyfikowali co najmniej 130 różnych osób, prawie wyłącznie mężczyzn, w większości w wieku od 20 do 30 lat.

Ta liczba pokazuje skalę bitwy. "Mamy co najmniej 130 poległych, oraz 5 zabitych koni. A póki co przekopaliśmy dopiero 450 metrów kwadratowych. To maksymalnie 10 procent całej powierzchni pola bitwy, a może nawet tylko 3 do 4 procent", mówi Detlef Jantzen, naczelny archeolog MVDHP. "Gdybyśmy przekopali cały obszar, zapewne znaleźlibyśmy już 750 poległych. To niewiarygodna liczba jak na epokę brązu."

(...) Jantzen oraz Terberger szacują, że jeśli zginął i został na polu bitwy co piąty jej uczestnik, to znaczyłoby, że w sumie walczyło w niej jakieś 4000 wojowników.

Brinker, antropolożka sądowa nadzorująca analizę szczątków, mówi że wilgotność i skład chemiczny gleby w Dolinie Tollense prawie perfekcyjnie zakonserwowały kości. "Możemy dokładnie zrekonstruować co się stało", dodaje, pokazując nam żebro z dwoma malutkimi nacięciami w kształcie litery V na jednym z brzegów. "Te ślady na żebrze pokazują, że został on dźgnięty [włócznią?] dwukrotnie w to samo miejsce. Mamy mnóstwo takich znalezisk, często wielokrotne ślady na tym samym żebrze."

(...)

W trakcie gdy doszło do tej bitwy, północna Europa wydawała się być miejscem pozbawionym miast, a nawet innych większych osad. Z dotychczasowej wiedzy archeologów wynika, że ludzie tutaj (...) żyli ze swoimi wielopokoleniowymi rodzinami w pojedynczych gospodarstwach, a gęstość zaludnienia wynosiła mniej niż 5 osób na kilometr kwadratowy. Najbliższa znana archeologom duża osada z tego okresu znajdowała się ponad 350 kilometrów na południowy-wschód, w Watenstedt. Krajobraz był podobny do rolniczych części Europy obecnie (...)

A jednak chemiczne wskaźniki w szczątkach sugeruję, że większość z wojowników poległych pod Tollense przybyła na pole bitwy z obszarów odległych o setki kilometrów. Izotopy w szkliwie zębów stanowią odbicie tych znajdujących się w pożywieniu i w wodzie jakie dana osoba spożywa i pije w dzieciństwie, co z kolei zależy od geologii danego obszaru - są to markery miejsca gdzie dana osoba dorastała. Archeolog z Uniwersytetu Stanu Wisconsin w Madison, Doug Price, przeanalizował izotopy strontu, tlenu i węgla w 20 zębach różnych poległych pod Tollense. Tylko kilku z nich wykazywało wartości izotopów typowe dla Niziny Północnoeuropejskiej, która ciągnie się od Holandii do Polski. Posiadacze pozostałych zębów przybyli z obszarów położonych dalej, chociaż póki co Price jeszcze nie zdołał ustalić skąd dokładnie. "Zakres wartości izotopów jest naprawdę duży", powiedział. "Możemy z dużym prawdopodobieństwem stwierdzić, że zabici przybyli na pole bitwy z wielu różnych regionów".

Kolejne wskazówki dają nam dane z izotopów innego pierwiastka, azotu, które odzwierciedlają dietę. Izotopy azotu z zębów niektórych wojowników sugerują, że ich dieta była bogata w proso, zboże w tamtym czasie bardziej popularne w Europie południowej niż w północnej [a nie czasem także w Europie wschodniej? - uwaga moja]

Analiza genetyczna dopiero się rozpoczyna, ale jak dotąd podpiera hipotezę o zróżnicowanym i odległym pochodzeniu wojowników. DNA pobrane z zębów sugeruje, że niektórzy byli krewnymi współczesnych południowych Europejczyków, a inni krewnymi mieszkańców współczesnej Polski oraz Skandynawii. "To nie była banda miejscowych głupków" - mówi genetyk z Uniwersytetu w Mainz, Joachim Burger. "To bardzo różnorodna populacja".

Vandkilde z Uniwersytetu w Aarhus dodaje: "To była armia podobna do tej opisanej w eposie Homera, która składała się z wielu mniejszych drużyn wojowników, zebranych z wielkiego obszaru w celu zdobycia Troi" - uważa się, że zdobycie Troi nastąpiło ok. roku 1184 p.n.e., czyli niecałe 100 lat później niż wedle datowania miała miejsce bitwa pod Tollense.

To wszystko wskazuje na istnienie zakrojonej na niespodziewanie szeroką skalę sieci powiązań czy też organizacji społecznej, mówi Jantzen. "Stoczenie bitwy jak ta zbierając wszystkich tych ludzi z bardzo odległych obszarów w jednym miejscu, było naprawdę niesamowitym osiągnięciem", dodaje. (...)"

Wyposażenie niektórych spośród znalezionych wojowników:

http://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/fi...g?itok=QXbzKPUA

Ten post był edytowany przez Domen: 26/03/2016, 17:00
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #3

     
marc20
 

VIII ranga
********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 3.243
Nr użytkownika: 80.503

Stopień akademicki: student
Zawód: student
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 20:39 Quote Post

QUOTE
Północna Europa w epoce brązu długo była zbywana jako zaścianek, pozostający w cieniu bardziej zaawansowanych cywilizacji Bliskiego Wschodu oraz Grecji.

No proszę, może kiedyś jeszcze się doczekamy uznania Imperium Lechitów rolleyes.gif
 
User is online!  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #4

     
wysoki
 

X ranga
**********
Grupa: Moderatorzy
Postów: 17.161
Nr użytkownika: 72.513

Rafal Mazur
Stopień akademicki: magazynier
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 20:49 Quote Post

QUOTE(WojciechS @ 25/03/2016, 19:20)
QUOTE
DNA from teeth suggests some warriors are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland and Scandinavia.


To mógł być taki Grunwald z epoki brązu. Ciekawe, kto wygrał? Słowianie czy Skandynawowie? Po której stronie walczyły posiłki z południa Europy? W tym czasie związki Polski z południem już były silne, mamy ‘Karpackie Mykeny”, a więc chyba Bałkany były z nami. Kto walczył po stronie Skandynawów? Czytałem gdzieś o bliskich kontaktach handlowych Skandynawii z półwyspem Iberyjskim w tamtych czasach. Bardzo to wszystko ciekawe. Czekamy na analizy DNA.
*


A gdzie tu masz informację o tym, że tam walczyli Słowianie?
QUOTE
are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #5

     
czarny piotruś
 

IX ranga
*********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 4.638
Nr użytkownika: 77.765

 
 
post 25/03/2016, 20:52 Quote Post

Zgłoszę wątpliwości co szacowania całości zaangażowanych w bitwę jak i też zabitych na podstawie jednego masowego pochówku. Nie mozna przecież wykluczyć, że są to wszyscy zabici strony przegranej wrzuceni do jednego masowego grobu np. Podobnie rzecz ma się z szacunkiem całości biorących udział na podstawie samych zabitych. Równie dobrze mogło ich być 500 tylko bitwa była bardzo krwawa.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #6

     
pawelboch
 

VI ranga
******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 1.251
Nr użytkownika: 33.982

Pawel
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 22:07 Quote Post

QUOTE(czarny piotruś @ 25/03/2016, 21:52)
Zgłoszę wątpliwości co szacowania całości zaangażowanych w bitwę jak i też zabitych na podstawie jednego masowego pochówku. Nie mozna przecież wykluczyć, że są to wszyscy zabici strony przegranej wrzuceni do jednego masowego grobu np. Podobnie rzecz ma się z szacunkiem całości biorących udział na podstawie samych zabitych. Równie dobrze mogło ich być 500 tylko bitwa była bardzo krwawa.
*



Tam jest wyraźnie napisane, że kości są wszędzie (to nie jest jakiś pojedynczy grób!), a przebadano niewielką część terenu. Kwestia "przeliczenia" ilości ofiar śmiertelnych na ilość uczestników boju jest faktycznie dyskusyjna, zakładam, że na czymś się opierali, aczkolwiek również z chęcią zapoznałbym się z założeniami tego szacunku.
Druga sprawa to udział w bitnie kilku grup etnicznych, kilku różnych kultur, więc to nie jakaś lokalna utarczka, tylko bardziej "bitwa narodów". Sprawa jest bez wątpienia rozwojowa, szczególnie że mnóstwo artefaktów.
Ciekawe czy w Polsce kogoś to zainteresuje, czy da się to jakoś łączyć z tym co wiemy. Czy na terenie Polski znajdują sie analogiczne pobojowiska?
pzdr., PB

P.S.
Szacunek dla tłumacza, że mu się chciało wink.gif

Ten post był edytowany przez pawelboch: 25/03/2016, 22:12
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #7

     
Swojak
 

I ranga
*
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 20
Nr użytkownika: 97.648

 
 
post 25/03/2016, 22:11 Quote Post

Najciekawszy jest fragment "wojownicy pochodzili z wielu różnych grup etnicznych". Paneuropejska sieć sojuszy w epoce brązu? Czy też całe wydarzenie miało charakter kulturowy (coś jak azteckie "wojny kwiatowe") i wojownicy wręcz pielgrzymowali by wziąć udział w rzezi?
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #8

     
WojciechS
 

III ranga
***
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 212
Nr użytkownika: 84.297

Zawód: student
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 22:26 Quote Post

Autorzy napisali, że część poległych wojowników była podobna do współczesnych mieszkańców Polski, czyli do Słowian. Nie do mieszkańców Litwy, czyli Bałtów, nie do mieszańców Niemiec, czyli Germanów, nie do mieszkańców Irlandii, czyli Celtów itp.
Należy zatem przyjąć hipotezę, że to byli Słowianie ponieważ jest najbardziej prawdopodobna w świetle faktów.
Jeśli znasz bardziej prawdopodobne hipotezy to spróbuj je uzasadnić.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #9

     
wysoki
 

X ranga
**********
Grupa: Moderatorzy
Postów: 17.161
Nr użytkownika: 72.513

Rafal Mazur
Stopień akademicki: magazynier
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 22:39 Quote Post

QUOTE(WojciechS @ 25/03/2016, 23:26)
Autorzy napisali, że część poległych wojowników była podobna do współczesnych mieszkańców Polski, czyli do Słowian. Nie do mieszkańców Litwy, czyli Bałtów, nie do mieszańców Niemiec, czyli Germanów, nie do mieszkańców Irlandii, czyli Celtów itp.
Należy zatem przyjąć hipotezę, że to byli Słowianie ponieważ jest najbardziej prawdopodobna w świetle faktów.
Jeśli znasz bardziej prawdopodobne hipotezy to spróbuj je uzasadnić.
*


Chyba Wojciechu błędnie podchodzisz do problemu kto tu co ma udowadniać.
Ja nie zbudowałem teorii o "Grunwaldzie" na podstawie kilku słów tylko pytam o jej podstawy. Więc udowadnianie czegoś należy tu do Ciebie, nie do mnie wink.gif.
Mieszkańcy Polski mają geny różnych nacji i ktoś z nimi spokrewniony nie musi być od razu Słowianinem.
Dlatego przypomniałem, że trzeba zwrócić uwagę na określenie
QUOTE
DNA from teeth suggests some warriors are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland and Scandinavia

nie wspomnę już o
CODE
suggests


Przed stworzeniem teorii o "Drugim Grunwaldzie" warto zaczekać na więcej danych.


EDIT.
Może zresztą wyjaśnię bardziej o co chodzi.

Sama bitwa niezwykle ciekawa a informacje o wynikach badań DNA jeszcze bardziej. Ale tyle już czytałem informacji, które potem okazywały się nieco lub bardziej czym innym niż pierwotnie wyglądały, że wolałbym zaczekać na podanie tych wyników niż jednozdaniowego podsumowania.

Więcej informacji i więcej konkretów - potem wyciąganie wniosków i stawianie teorii.

Sprawa niewątpliwie do śledzenia i liczę na duże zainteresowanie mediów, co zaowocuje większą ilością danych.


Ten post był edytowany przez wysoki: 25/03/2016, 22:47
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #10

     
WojciechS
 

III ranga
***
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 212
Nr użytkownika: 84.297

Zawód: student
 
 
post 25/03/2016, 22:50 Quote Post

QUOTE(wysoki @ 25/03/2016, 22:39)
Mieszkańcy Polski mają geny różnych nacji i ktoś z nimi spokrewniony nie musi być od razu Słowianinem.
*



Kolego wysoki, mieszkańcy Polski mają przede wszystkim geny nacji polskiej, która zalicza się do zachodnich Słowian.
Badacze nie wykryli u części poległych wojowników genów innych nacji zamieszkujących Polskę, tylko geny nacji polskiej. Wykrycie genów innych nacji z pewnością skutkowało by uwagą o podobieństwie genów części poległych wojowników do innych nacji, a nie do genów nacji polskiej.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #11

     
Domen
 

IX ranga
*********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 7.938
Nr użytkownika: 14.456

 
 
post 25/03/2016, 23:12 Quote Post

QUOTE(WojciechS @ 25/03/2016, 18:20)
QUOTE
DNA from teeth suggests some warriors are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland and Scandinavia.

(...) Czekamy na analizy DNA.


Właśnie to stwierdzenie jest bardzo ciekawe. Pytanie skąd przybyli na pole bitwy ci "krewni Polaków"? confused1.gif

Bitwę wydatowali na ok. rok 1250 p.n.e. Tymczasem mamy już próbkę mężczyzny spod Halberstadt datowaną na lata 1113-1021 p.n.e., który to mężczyzna posiadał jeśli chodzi o Y-DNA klad R1a1a1b1a2-Z280, a ten klad jest bardzo rozpowszechniony u współczesnych Polaków. Jak widać żył on stosunkowo niedługo po omawianej tutaj bitwie (w dodatku mógł być osobą należącą do ludności kultury łużyckiej, a w każdym razie do kręgu kultur pól popielnicowych).

Autorzy piszą wprost, że niektórzy z wojowników poległych pod Tollensee w 1250 p.n.e. "są spokrewnieni z ludnością współczesnej Polski". Pytanie tylko, czy mają na myśli też pokrewieństwo autosomalne, czy raczej jedynie to, że wśród tych ponad 130 poległych wojowników odnaleziono takich z kladem R1a-Z280 (podobnych do mężczyzny spod Halberstadt), albo - co byłoby jeszcze ciekawsze - z kladem R1a-M458, również bardzo powszechnym dziś w Polsce.

Bez wątpienia autorzy będą analizować (a pewnie już są w trakcie!) nie tylko haplogrupy, ale także DNA autosomalne wojowników spod Tollensee. Wiadomo to chociażby z tego linku, gdzie piszą, że chcą sprawdzić nie tylko Y-DNA, ale też m.in. geny odpowiedzialne za metabolizm wapnia i witaminy D:

http://gepris.dfg.de/gepris/OCTOPUS?contex...task=showDetail

QUOTE
Furthermore, the excellent preservation of these samples will allow us to conduct a population- genetic analysis of paternal lineages. Not least, this is an opportunity to retrace evolutionary adaptation processes (e.g. Calcium- and Vitamin D metabolism) originating in the Neolithic transition. We plan to use mitochondrial and nuclear aDNA capture essays and next generation sequencing technology to generate the most comprehensive prehistoric DNA data set to date. This study will be the first to combine multi locus aDNA capture assays and spatially explicit coalescence analyses of prehistoric DNA, and will undoubtedly set a new standard for human population genetics. The relevance of these results will extend far beyond the archaeological site of the Tollense Valley, and our data will be interpreted within the diachronic and supra-regional context of European population history.


Jak również z tego linku, gdzie piszą, że mogą sprawdzić geny odpowiedzialne za kolor włosów i kolor oczu poległych wojowników:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/sla...eagebattle-3174

QUOTE
Ancient DNA could potentially reveal much more: When compared to other Bronze Age samples from around Europe at this time, it could point to the homelands of the warriors as well as such traits as eye and hair color. Genetic analysis is just beginning, but so far it supports the notion of far-flung origins. DNA from teeth suggests some warriors are related to modern southern Europeans and others to people living in modern-day Poland and Scandinavia.


Czyli DNA autosomalne będziemy mieli na bank (a nie tylko same haplogrupy Y-DNA i mtDNA).

Ten post był edytowany przez Domen: 25/03/2016, 23:20
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #12

     
kmat
 

Podkarpacki Rabator
*********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 8.172
Nr użytkownika: 40.110

Stopień akademicki: mgr
 
 
post 26/03/2016, 1:37 Quote Post

Samo Z280 to może być cokolwiek, między Łabą a Wołgą trudno znaleźć miejsce, gdzie tego nie ma. Przydałoby się uściślenie jaka to podgrupa.
A sama rzecz jest ciekawa. Co może być interesujące - ustalenie na podstawie tych izotopów, kto skąd przybył, i jak to się ma do podobieństwa genetycznego do współczesnych populacji. Czy się to pokrywa, czy są różnice.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #13

     
Domen
 

IX ranga
*********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 7.938
Nr użytkownika: 14.456

 
 
post 26/03/2016, 2:30 Quote Post

QUOTE("kmat")
Samo Z280 to może być cokolwiek, między Łabą a Wołgą trudno znaleźć miejsce, gdzie tego nie ma.


Prawda. Ale tutaj również interesująca wydaje się być kwestia przybycia pierwszych Z280 w tamte rejony.

Bo wydaje się, że tego Z280 między Renem/Łabą a Odrą/Wisłą chyba jeszcze nie było w okresie kultury ceramiki sznurowej.

Zachodnia część KCS na terenie Niemiec to - jak się na chwilę obecną wydaje - w dużej mierze R1a CTS4385 oraz L664, a być może także inne klady R1a (np. paragrupa M417*), ale raczej nie Z280 czy M458. Do tego oczywiście dochodzi Z284, ale to w skandynawskiej części KCS (gdzie nadal jest powszechny).

Dzisiaj klady typu L664 występują w niskiej frekwencji i prawie wyłącznie na terenie Europy Zachodniej. Do niedawna uważano, że to jest jakieś "staroeuropejskie" i nie mające nic wspólnego z ekspansjami IE, ale po odkryciu tych kladów w KCS należy uznać, że te linie właśnie szły dopiero w pierwszej fali ekspansji indoeuropejskich "Sznurowców" i przez pewien czas zamieszkiwały na terenie Niemiec, ale następnie - jak się wydaje - emigrowały lub zostały wyparte dalej na zachód, a w Niemczech zastąpiła je częściowo ludność R1b kultury pucharów dzwonowatych, a częściowo inne R1a (np. Z280) z kolejnych fal potomków ludności KCS.

Pierwsze niewątpliwe Z280 pojawia się w Niemczech dopiero kilkaset do tysiąca lat po upadku tamtejszej KCS.

Pytanie z jaką ludnością to do Niemiec przylazło, i skąd (wygląda na to, że ze wschodu).

====================

Inna sprawa, że póki co nie wiemy, czy w tym artykule określono część spośród wojowników poległych pod Tollense jako - cytuję - "related to people living in modern-day Poland" na podstawie podobieństw Y-DNA, mtDNA, czy na podstawie podobieństw autosomalnych? A może wszystkich trzech jednocześnie?

QUOTE("kmat")
A sama rzecz jest ciekawa. Co może być interesujące - ustalenie na podstawie tych izotopów, kto skąd przybył, i jak to się ma do podobieństwa genetycznego do współczesnych populacji. Czy się to pokrywa, czy są różnice.


Dokładnie. Porównanie poszczególnych uczestników bitwy do populacji epoki brązu z różnych rejonów, a następnie do współczesnych.

Ten post był edytowany przez Domen: 26/03/2016, 2:36
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #14

     
pawelboch
 

VI ranga
******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 1.251
Nr użytkownika: 33.982

Pawel
 
 
post 26/03/2016, 10:39 Quote Post

QUOTE(Domen @ 26/03/2016, 3:30)
Inna sprawa, że póki co nie wiemy, czy w tym artykule określono część spośród wojowników poległych pod Tollense jako - cytuję - "related to people living in modern-day Poland" na podstawie podobieństw Y-DNA, mtDNA, czy na podstawie podobieństw autosomalnych? A może wszystkich trzech jednocześnie?


A może tylko (na razie) biometrycznie?
Ja to rozumiem tak, że mają już jakieś próbki przebadane, ale do wyników daleko i wypuszczają w artykule tylko wstępne przemyślenia. Mają obecnie kości od ponad 130 osób do przebadania (ale tylko 20 czaszek, dziwne, co się stało z resztą? czaszka to dość duża kość) i tylko kilka procent przekopanego terenu. To jest ogrom pracy, o finansach nie wspominając.
Mam nadzieję, że pójdą na ciosem i zrobią prace na całej powierzchni.
pzdr., PB

QUOTE(Sarissoforoj @ 26/03/2016, 0:16)
Kolego mieniący się studentem, a od kiedy to narodowość i język mają coś wspólnego z genami?
*


Jakaś tam korelacja jest, nawet było to badane statystycznie, ale myślę, że na potrzeby tego wątku, by za bardzo nie offtopować, można przyjąć uproszczenie "funkcjonalne", że populacja będąca bezpośrednio przodkiem populacji słowiańskiej, też jest "słowiańska".
pzdr., PB
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #15

14 Strony  1 2 3 > »  
1 Użytkowników czyta ten temat (1 Gości i 0 Anonimowych użytkowników)
0 Zarejestrowanych:


Topic Options
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 

 
Copyright © 2003 - 2019 Historycy.org
historycy@historycy.org, tel: 12 346-54-06

Kolokacja serwera, łącza internetowe:
Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej