Witaj GOŚCIU ( Zaloguj się | Rejestracja )
 
 
Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Powstanie niewolników w Bahia w 1835 roku, Muzułmanie jako elita
     
rycymer
 

Ellentengernagyként
*********
Grupa: Przyjaciel forum
Postów: 5.900
Nr użytkownika: 30.754

Mariusz Borecki
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 14:54 Quote Post

Zaciekawił mnie bardzo ten artykuł... Prosiłbym o podanie jakichś ciekawych, oprócz tych podanych w tekście, pozycji na ten temat... Będę dozgonnie wdzięczny! wink.gif
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #1

     
yarovit
 

Lemming Pride Worldwide
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.684
Nr użytkownika: 22.276

Zawód: Radca prawny
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 15:49 Quote Post

Ja bym ostroznie podchodzil do tego, co publikuje sie na arabia.pl
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #2

     
rycymer
 

Ellentengernagyként
*********
Grupa: Przyjaciel forum
Postów: 5.900
Nr użytkownika: 30.754

Mariusz Borecki
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 15:53 Quote Post

QUOTE(yarovit @ 1/08/2007, 16:49)
Ja bym ostroznie podchodzil do tego, co publikuje sie na arabia.pl
*



Z podobną opinią spotkałem się na www.islam.fora.pl, jednak artykuł ten zaciekawił mnie na tyle, iż poszukuję teraz literatury na ten temat, by móc samodzielnie zweryfikować fakty, o których mowa we wspomnianym artykule... smile.gif
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #3

     
yarovit
 

Lemming Pride Worldwide
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.684
Nr użytkownika: 22.276

Zawód: Radca prawny
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:02 Quote Post

Chyba najlepiej dorwac cos na temat afrykanskiego handlu niewolnikami.

Ironiczne jest to, ze Biali kupowali niewolnikow na miejscowych afrykanskich targach, gdzie sprzedajacymi byli miejscowi kacykowie oraz przede wszystkim Arabowie. Ci ostatni lapali wlasnie nie-Muzulmanow. O ile bowiem islam przyklepuje niewolnictwo, to zabrania niewolenia Wiernych.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #4

     
rycymer
 

Ellentengernagyként
*********
Grupa: Przyjaciel forum
Postów: 5.900
Nr użytkownika: 30.754

Mariusz Borecki
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:23 Quote Post

QUOTE(yarovit @ 1/08/2007, 17:02)
Chyba najlepiej dorwac cos na temat afrykanskiego handlu niewolnikami.

Ironiczne jest to, ze Biali kupowali niewolnikow na miejscowych afrykanskich targach, gdzie sprzedajacymi byli miejscowi kacykowie oraz przede wszystkim Arabowie. Ci ostatni lapali wlasnie nie-Muzulmanow. O ile bowiem islam przyklepuje niewolnictwo, to zabrania niewolenia Wiernych.
*



Często zapomina się o tym, iż to afrykańscy władcy, toczący ze sobą wojny, niejednokrotnie w celu zdobycia niewolników właśnie, dostarczali "czarne złoto" zarówno Arabom, jak i Europejczykom... Poza tym, z tego, co mi wiadomo, Żydzi też mieli swój udział w tym niecnym procederze, i to nawet dość duży... rolleyes.gif Ale - niech żyje polityczna poprawność! wink.gif
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #5

     
yarovit
 

Lemming Pride Worldwide
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.684
Nr użytkownika: 22.276

Zawód: Radca prawny
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:36 Quote Post

Tak. Afrykanscy wodzusiowie nie byli zadowoleni z zakonczenia handlu niewolnikami.

Kilka cytatow:

QUOTE
The vast majority of slaves taken out of Africa were sold by African rulers, traders and a military aristocracy who all grew wealthy from the business. Most slaves were acquired through wars or by kidnapping. The Portuguese Duatre Pacheco Pereire wrote in the early sixteenth century after a visit to Benin that the kingdom "is usually at war with its neighbours and takes many captives, whom we buy at twelve or fifteen brass bracelets each, or for copper bracelets, which they prize more." Olaudah Equiano, an ex-slave, described in his memoirs published in 1789 how African rulers carried out raids to capture slaves. "When a trader wants slaves, he applies to a chief for them, and tempts him with his wares. It is not extraordinary, if on this occasion he yields to the temptation with as little firmness, and accepts the price of his fellow creature's liberty with as little reluctance, as the enlightened merchant. Accordingly, he falls upon his neighbours, and a desperate battle ensues...if he prevails, and takes prisoners, he gratifies his avarice by selling them." Equiano was born in 1745 in an area under the kingdom of Benin. At the age of ten he was kidnapped by slave hunters who also took his sister. He was more fortunate than most other slaves. After serving in America, the West Indies and England he was able to save for and buy his freedom in 1756 at the age of twenty-one.


QUOTE
Africa's rulers, traders and military aristocracy protected their interest in the slave trade. They discouraged Europeans from leaving the coastal areas to venture into the interior of the continent. European trading companies realised the benefit of dealing with African suppliers and not unnecessarily antagonising them. The companies could not have mustered the resources it would have taken to directly capture the tens of millions of people shipped out of Africa. It was far more sensible and safer to give Africans guns to fight the many wars that yielded captives for the trade. The slave trading network stretched deep into the Africa's interior. Slave trading firms were aware of their dependency on African suppliers. The Royal African Company, for instance, instructed its agents on the West coast "if any differences happen, to endeavour an amicable accommodation rather than use force." They were "to endeavour to live in all friendship with them" and "to hold frequent palavers with the Kings and the Great Men of the Country, and keep up a good correspondent with them, ingratiating yourself by such prudent methods" as may be deemed appropriate.


Teraz bedzie kwiatek:

QUOTE
When Britain abolished the slave trade in 1807 it not only had to contend with opposition from white slavers but also from African rulers who had become accustomed to wealth gained from selling slaves or from taxes collected on slaves passed through their domain. African slave-trading classes were greatly distressed by the news that legislators sitting in parliament in London had decided to end their source of livelihood. But for as long as there was demand from the Americas for slaves, the lucrative business continued.


QUOTE
Nigeria kept its important position in the slave trade throughout the great expansion of the transatlantic trade after the middle of the seventeenth century. Slightly more slaves came from the Nigerian coast than from Angola in the eighteenth century, while in the nineteenth century perhaps 30 percent of all slaves sent across the Atlantic came from Nigeria. Over the period of the whole trade, more than 3.5 million slaves were shipped from Nigeria to the Americas. Most of these slaves were Igbo and Yoruba, with significant concentrations of Hausa, Ibibio, and other ethnic groups. In the eighteenth century, two polities--Oyo and the Aro confederacy--were responsible for most of the slaves exported from Nigeria. The Aro confederacy continued to export slaves through the 1830s, but most slaves in the nineteenth century were a product of the Yoruba civil wars that followed the collapse of Oyo in the 1820s.

The expansion of Oyo after the middle of the sixteenth century was closely associated with the growth of slave exports across the Atlantic. Oyo's cavalry pushed southward along a natural break in the forests (known as the Benin Gap, i.e., the opening in the forest where the savanna stretched to the Bight of Benin), and thereby gained access to the coastal ports.

Oyo experienced a series of power struggles and constitutional crises in the eighteenth century that directly related to its success as a major slave exporter. The powerful Oyo Mesi, the council of warlords that checked the king, forced a number of kings to commit suicide. In 1754 the head of the Oyo Mesi, basorun Gaha, seized power, retaining a series of kings as puppets. The rule of this military oligarchy was overcome in 1789, when King Abiodun successfully staged a countercoup and forced the suicide of Gaha. Abiodun and his successors maintained the supremacy of the monarchy until the second decade of the nineteenth century, primarily because of the reliance of the king on a cavalry force that was independent of the Oyo Mesi. This force was recruited largely from Muslim slaves, especially Hausa, from farther north.

The other major slave-exporting state was a loose confederation under the leadership of the Aro, an Igbo clan of mixed Igbo and Ibibio origins, whose home was on the escarpment between the central Igbo districts and the Cross River. Beginning in the late seventeenth century, the Aro built a complex network of alliances and treaties with many of the Igbo clans. They served as arbiters in villages throughout Igboland, and their famous oracle at Arochukwu, located in a thickly wooded gorge, was widely regarded as a court of appeal for many kinds of disputes. By custom the Aro were sacrosanct, allowing them to travel anywhere with their goods without fear of attack. Alliances with certain Igbo clans who acted as mercenaries for the Aro guaranteed their safety. As oracle priests, they also received slaves in payment of fines or dedicated to the gods by their masters as scapegoats for their own transgressions. These slaves thereby became the property of the Aro priests, who were at liberty to sell them.

Besides their religious influence, the Aro established their ascendancy through a combination of commercial acumen and diplomatic skill. Their commercial empire was based on a set of twenty-four-day fairs and periodic markets that dotted the interior. Resident Aro dominated these markets and collected slaves for export. They had a virtual monopoly of the slave trade after the collapse of Oyo in the 1820s. Villages suspected of violating treaties with the Aro were subject to devastating raids that not only produced slaves for export but also maintained Aro influence. The Aro had treaties with the coastal ports from which slaves were exported, especially Calabar, Bonny, and Elem Kalabari. The people of Calabar were Efik, a subsection of Ibibio, while Bonny and Elem Kalabari were Ijaw towns.


Zrodla:
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?frd/...d(DOCID+ng0019)
ww.afbis.com/analysis/slave.htm
http://africanhistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa080601a.htm
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #6

     
rycymer
 

Ellentengernagyként
*********
Grupa: Przyjaciel forum
Postów: 5.900
Nr użytkownika: 30.754

Mariusz Borecki
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:44 Quote Post

Ciekawy artykuł znajduje się również tutaj.

QUOTE
Warto też, aby wszyscy, którzy domagają się wypłacenia krajom afrykańskim odszkodowań, wzięli pod uwagę, że wbrew temu, co się sądzi, biali handlarze wcale na Murzynów nie polowali osobiście. Nie musieli tego robić — wyręczały ich w tym lokalne plemiona afrykańskie z terenów nadbrzeżnych polujące na swoich, mieszkających w głębi lądu pobratymców, aby ich sprzedawać białym kupcom. Gdy pojawiły się projekty, aby kraje zachodnie wypłaciły narodom afrykańskim odszkodowania za niewolnictwo, prezydent Senegalu Abdoulaye Wade uznał je za niedorzeczne. Nie bez powodu: Dakar, stolica jego kraju, był jednym z wielkich centrów eksportowych „czarnego złota” i gdyby miało dojść do płacenia odszkodowań, to nie bez racji dzisiejsi amerykańscy Murzyni mieliby podstawy domagać się od dzisiejszych Senegalczyków odszkodowań za to, że ich przodkowie sprzedali ich białym. Prezydent nie powiedział głośno, że sam jest potomkiem lokalnych królów, którzy dorobili się na handlu rodakami, więc i od niego można się domagać rekompensaty...
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #7

     
yarovit
 

Lemming Pride Worldwide
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.684
Nr użytkownika: 22.276

Zawód: Radca prawny
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:51 Quote Post

Oczywiste jest, ze jakby kraje afrykanskie wystapily z takimi zadaniami, to pewnie by sie Zachod pokajal i wyplacil sumke. Ciekawe tylko, czy Arabowie by sie dorzucili.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #8

     
rycymer
 

Ellentengernagyként
*********
Grupa: Przyjaciel forum
Postów: 5.900
Nr użytkownika: 30.754

Mariusz Borecki
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:54 Quote Post

QUOTE
Ciekawe tylko, czy Arabowie by sie dorzucili.


Szczerze powiedziawszy, wątpie - przecież islam do dziś dnia nie widzi niczego złego w niewolnictwie: mało tego, kwitnie ono nadal, choćby w Mauretanii czy Sudanie...
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #9

     
yarovit
 

Lemming Pride Worldwide
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.684
Nr użytkownika: 22.276

Zawód: Radca prawny
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:58 Quote Post

Uwazam artykul z arabii.pl za bujde albo przynajmniej za naciagana historie wlasnie z powodu udzialu Arabow w handlu. Z tego powodu uwazam za niemozliwe, by niewolnikami u Bialych byly wieksze liczby Muzulmanow. To raz. Dwa, autor artykulu nie szczedzi nam opisow kultury niewolnikow ktorza miala o glowe przerastac kulture zniewalajacych. Pomijajac juz sama kontrowersyjnosc tezy, ze plemiona muzulmanskie z Afryki przerastaly pod wzgledem kultury materialnej Zachod 19 wieku, powstaje pytanie dlaczego nie zachowaly sie do dzisiaj zadne slady tej kultury w Brazylii? W kulturze Murzynow w Brazylii jest mnostwo elementow kulturowych wzietych z Afryki. Od strojow poczynajac, przez slownictwo, na tancach konczac. Tymczasem nie ma nic co by przypominalo cos o czym pisza autorzy. No i na koniec, dlaczego nie zachowaly sie zadne zabytki owego pisma?
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #10

     
yarovit
 

Lemming Pride Worldwide
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.684
Nr użytkownika: 22.276

Zawód: Radca prawny
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 16:59 Quote Post

QUOTE(rycymer @ 1/08/2007, 16:54)
QUOTE
Ciekawe tylko, czy Arabowie by sie dorzucili.


Szczerze powiedziawszy, wątpie - przecież islam do dziś dnia nie widzi niczego złego w niewolnictwie: mało tego, kwitnie ono nadal, choćby w Mauretanii czy Sudanie...
*




Moje pytanie bylo retoryczne i z duzo doza sarkazmu. Niewolnictwo istnieje w krajach muzulmanskich w Afryce. Zas w Zatoce jako ludnosc niemal niewolna traktuje sie gastarbeiterow z Indii, Pakistanu i Filipim.
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #11

     
rycymer
 

Ellentengernagyként
*********
Grupa: Przyjaciel forum
Postów: 5.900
Nr użytkownika: 30.754

Mariusz Borecki
 
 
post 1/08/2007, 17:03 Quote Post

Właśnie dlatego warto byłoby zweryfikować ten artykuł w konfrontacji z jakimiś rzetelnymi źródłami...

QUOTE
Moje pytanie bylo retoryczne i z duzo doza sarkazmu.


Nie śmiem wątpić... wink.gif
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #12

     
MikoQba
 

Presbyterian Westminster Confession
********
Grupa: Moderatorzy
Postów: 3.766
Nr użytkownika: 8.008

James Nicholson
Stopień akademicki: Dysortograf
Zawód: Dziennikarz
 
 
post 27/04/2009, 11:04 Quote Post

QUOTE
Ironiczne jest to, ze Biali kupowali niewolnikow na miejscowych afrykanskich targach, gdzie sprzedajacymi byli miejscowi kacykowie oraz przede wszystkim Arabowie. Ci ostatni lapali wlasnie nie-Muzulmanow. O ile bowiem islam przyklepuje niewolnictwo, to zabrania niewolenia Wiernych.

Jacy Arabowie? Europejczycy zaopatrywali się głównie w Zatoce Gwinejskiej, Angoli i rzadziej w Mozambiku. Tam Arabów nie było. Czarnych sprzedawali czarni, czasami byli to czarni muzułmanie ale nie Arabowie.

Co do Brazylii to tamtejsi niewolnicy Pochodzili w większości z Angoli gdzie muzułmanów nie było w ogóle. W ogóle wśród czarnych niewolników eksportowanych przez Atlantyk muzułmanie(a jeszcze bardziej chrześcijanie) występowali bardzo rzadko.
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #13

     
godfrydl
 

Diabolus in musica
*******
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 2.136
Nr użytkownika: 9.524

godfrydl
Stopień akademicki: mgr
Zawód: BANITA
 
 
post 8/02/2010, 11:11 Quote Post

QUOTE
Ciekawy artykuł znajduje się również tutaj.

W odniesieniu do artykułu przesłanego przez Rycymera zastanawiam się, czy Polska mogłaby domagać się zadośćuczynienia od Turcji za setki lat łowienia niewolników? Ukraina przynajmniej za to ma Krym. Turcja zaś stała się schronieniem Girejów po 1783r. i przez 300 lat była suzerenem chanatu - niech płacą!
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #14

     
doliwaq
 

I ranga
*
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 35
Nr użytkownika: 82.867

Hubert Zacharzewski
Zawód: student
 
 
post 9/08/2013, 23:36 Quote Post

A ja myślałem, że będzie to dyskusja o powstaniu w Bahii...
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #15

 
2 Użytkowników czyta ten temat (2 Gości i 0 Anonimowych użytkowników)
0 Zarejestrowanych:


Topic Options
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 

 
Copyright © 2003 - 2017 Historycy.org
historycy@historycy.org, tel: 12 346-54-06

Kolokacja serwera, łącza internetowe:
Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej