Witaj GOŚCIU ( Zaloguj się | Rejestracja )
 
5 Strony « < 3 4 5 
Reply to this topicStart new topicStart Poll

> Kolczuga a zbroja płytowa
     
Nortalf
 

III ranga
***
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 274
Nr użytkownika: 76.874

Maciej
Zawód: uczen Sokratesa
 
 
post 18/07/2016, 21:41 Quote Post

[EDIT] Kolumny w cytowanym tekście nie trzymają odstępów, więc może lepiej przescrolować całość i wejść w link który udostępniłem na końcu.
________________
Jeśli chodzi o ceny dokopałem się kiedyś do czegoś takiego:
QUOTE
Money goes as follows:
1 pound (L) = 20 shillings (s)
1 crown = 5 shillings
1 shilling = 12 pence (d)
1 penny = 4 farthings
1 mark = 13s 4d

ARMOR
Item                            Price       Date        Source  Page
Mail                            100s        12 cen(??   [7]     30
Ready-made Milanese armor       L8 6s 8d    1441        [4]     112
Squire's armor                  L5-L6 16s 8d "           "       "
Armor for Prince of Wales,
  "gilt and graven"             L340        1614        [5]     20
Complete Lance Armor            L3 6s 8d    1590        [5]     185
Complete corselets              30s          "           "       "
Cuirass of proof with pauldrons 40s          "           "       "
Normal cuirass with pauldrons   26s 8d       "           "       "
Target of proof                 30s          "           "       "
Morion                          3s 4d        "           "       "
Burgonet                        4s           "           "       "
Cuirass of pistol-proof with
  pauldrons                     L1 6s       1624        [5]     189-190
Cuirass without pauldrons       L1           "           "         "
Lance Armor                     L4           "           "         "
Targets of Proof                24s          "           "         "
Cuirass with cap                L4           "           "         "
Armor of proof                  L14 2s 8d   1667         "      68
Bascinet                        13s 4d +    1369         "      88
                                3s 4d to
                                line it
Armor in a merchant's house
  (leather?)                    5s          1285-1290   [3]     206
Total Armor owned by a knight   L16 6s 8d   1374         "      76
Armor in house of Thomas of
  Woodstock, duke of Gloucester L103        1397         "      77
Fee for cleaning rust off
  corselets                     5d each     1567        [5]     80
Fee for varnishing, replacing
  straps, and rivetting helmet
  and corselet                  1s 4d       1613        [5]     90
Barrel for cleaning mail        9d          1467        [5]     79
Note: mail is chain mail; almost all the rest is plate-armor. The armor of the knight in 1374 was probably mail with some plates; same for Gloucester's. Mail was extremely susceptible to rust, and was cleaned by rolling it in sand and vinegar in a barrel. Pauldrons are shoulder plates; morions are open helms, burgonets and bascinets closed helms; and a target refers to any of a number different kind of shields. Armor of proof is tested during the making with blows or shots from the strongest weapons of the time; if a weapon is listed, the armor does not claim to be proof against everything, only that it is proof up to that weapon's strength (eg pistol proof is not musket proof, but may be sword proof). All plate armor was lined with cloth, to pad the wearer, quiet the armor, and reduce wear between the pieces. This, along with the necessary straps, was a significant amount of the expense. An armorer asking for money to set up shop in 1624 estimated production costs and profit for a number of different types of armor: I give two examples below ([5], pp. 189-190).

Cuirass of proof with pauldrons:
  plates:                         5s 6d
  finishing, rivets, and straps:  7s 6d
  selling price                  26s
Lance armor:
  plates                        14s 5d
  finishing, et cetera          40s
  selling price                 80s

Dla porównania:
QUOTE
          TOOLS
Item                            Price       Date        Source  Page
2 yokes                         4s          c1350       [3]     170
Foot iron of plough             5d            "          "       "
3 mason's tools (not named)     9d            "          "       "
1 spade and shovel              3d          1457         "       "
1 axe                           5d            "          "       "
1 augur                         3d            "          "       "
1 vise                          13s 4d      1514        [5]     27-28
Large biciron                   60s           "          "        "
Small biciron                   16s           "          "        "
Anvil                           20s           "          "        "
Bellows                         30s           "          "        "
Hammers                         8d-2s 8d      "          "        "
2 chisels                       8d            "          "        "
Compete set of armorer's tools  L13 16s 11d   "          "        "
Spinning Wheel                  10 d         1457       [3]     170
                                  HORSES
Item                            Price       Date        Source  Page
War Horse                       up to 50s   12 cen  (?) [7]     30
War Horse                       up to L80   13 cen      [3]     72
Knight's 2 horses               L10         1374         "      76
High-grade riding horse         L10         13th cen     "      72
Draught horse                   10s-20s     13th cen     "       "

albo
QUOTE
BUILDINGS
Item                            Price       Date        Source  Page
Rent per annum for 138 shops on
  London Bridge                 L160 4s     1365        [2]     114
Rent for the three London
  taverns with the exclusive
  right to sell sweet wines
  (hippocras, clarry, piments)  L200        1365-1375   [2]     195-196
Rent cottage                    5s/year     14 cen(?)   [3]     208
Rent craftsman's house          20s/year     "           "       "
Rent merchant's house           L2-L3/year   "           "       "
Cottage (1 bay, 2 storeys)      L2          early 14 cen "      205
Row house in York (well built)  up to L5     "           "       "
Craftsman's house (i.e., with
  shop, work area, and room
  for workers) with 2-3 bays
  and tile roof                 L10-L15     early 14 cen [3]    205
Modest hall and chamber, not
  including materials           L12         1289        [3]     79-80
Merchant's house                L33-L66     early 14 cen [3]    205
House with courtyard            L90+         "           "       "
Goldsmiths' Hall (in London,
  with hall, kitchen, buttery,
  2 chambers)                   L136        1365        [2]     114
Large tiled barn                L83         1309-1310   [3]     79
Wooden gatehouse (30' long),
  barn, and drawbridge:
  Contract                      L5 6s 8d +  1341        [3]     81
                                builder's
                                clothing
  Estimated total               L16          "           "       "
Stone Gatehouse (40' X 18'):
  with all except stone         L16 13s 4d  1313        [3]     79-80
  estimated with stone          L30          "           "        "
Tower in castle's curtain wall  L333, L395  late 14 cen  "        "
Castle & college at Tattershall L450/annum  1434-1446    "      81
                                for 13 years
Transept of Gloucester Abbey    L781        1368-1373   [3]     79-80
Stonework of church (125', no   L113        13 cen(?)    "        "
  tower)                        (contract)
note: tithes were often calculated at 1d a week for every 20s of annual rent paid (4, p. 208).

Ceny oczywiście są angielskie i dodatkowo forma prezentacji danych nie jest najbardziej przyjazna, ale porównując ceny można się zorientować jakie były między nimi proporcje.
http://web.archive.org/web/20110628231215/...ices.html#ARMOR

Ten post był edytowany przez Nortalf: 18/07/2016, 21:47
 
User is offline  PMMini ProfileEmail Poster Post #61

     
Halstatt
 

III ranga
***
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 180
Nr użytkownika: 99.639

TROLL KLON
 
 
post 18/07/2016, 22:02 Quote Post

QUOTE(Ramond @ 18/07/2016, 18:23)
A kto dziś na co dzień nosi kolczugę czy kamizelkę kuloodporną? Chyba przecieniasz niebezpieczeństwa ówczesnych miast.
*


Myślę, że nie bardzo przesadzam bo zabicie kogoś kto nie był patrycjuszem było w zasadzie bezkarne.
Nie było żadnych służb porządkowych, morderstwo dopiero po reformie Sulli stało się w ogóle przestępstwem. Miasta były opanowane przez nożowników i trucicieli Recenzja książki "Lex Cornelia de sicariis et veneficis. Ustawa Korneliusza Sulli przeciwko nożownikom i trucicielom 81 r. p.n.e."

Sytuacja miast średniowiecznych to inna rzeczywistość - nie dość, że każdy chodził uzbrojony to były straże miejskie oraz sądy dotyczące w mieście w zasadzie wszytskich - i szlachtę i mieszczan. Chłopów w miastach nie było.

Tak btw. rewolwerowcy Dzikiego Zachodu to efekt obowiązywania prawa, a nie bezprawia smile.gif
Za zabicie kogoś groził stryczek. Chyba że w samoobronie - czyli ten kto wyjął broń drugi.

Ten post był edytowany przez Halstatt: 18/07/2016, 22:05
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #62

     
Barg
 

IX ranga
*********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 4.780
Nr użytkownika: 56.976

 
 
post 22/07/2016, 10:28 Quote Post

QUOTE(wysoki @ 18/07/2016, 20:39)
QUOTE(Barg @ 15/07/2016, 8:33)
Tu trochę danych o cenach zbroi:
*


Dzięki za skan, teraz przydało by się jeszcze coś o walucie. Ja pamiętam, że Jagiełło przejął system Kazimierza Wielkiego, czyli 16 denarów na grosz i 48 groszy na grzywnę, ale potem zmienił na 18 denarów na grosz. Floren w XVI w. miał (mieć) 30 groszy - jak to wszystko wyglądało w XV w.?
*


Wróciłem z morza i jestem padnięty. Poszperam w książkach koło niedzieli i zobaczę co znajde, ewentualnie wrzucę dane w poniedziałek, wtorek.
 
User is online!  PMMini Profile Post #63

     
Darth Stalin
 

X ranga
**********
Grupa: Użytkownik
Postów: 11.019
Nr użytkownika: 3.971

Zawód: hejter PiS-u
 
 
post 22/07/2016, 11:50 Quote Post

QUOTE(Halstatt)
morderstwo dopiero po reformie Sulli stało się w ogóle przestępstwem. Miasta były opanowane przez nożowników i trucicieli

Łoj, młody człowieku, bzdury opowiadasz. Nawet z linkowanej recenzji niczego nie zrozumiałeś...
 
User is offline  PMMini Profile Post #64

5 Strony « < 3 4 5 
2 Użytkowników czyta ten temat (2 Gości i 0 Anonimowych użytkowników)
0 Zarejestrowanych:


Topic Options
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 

 
Copyright © 2003 - 2019 Historycy.org
historycy@historycy.org, tel: 12 346-54-06

Kolokacja serwera, łącza internetowe:
Uniwersytet Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej